Journal of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery

CORRESPONDENCE
Year
: 2016  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 133--135

Observations on CO2 laser preparation of recipient site for noncultured cell suspension transplantation in vitiligo


Lisa Komen1, Charlotte Vrijman1, JP Wietze van der Veen2, Menno A de Rie3, Albert Wolkerstorfer1,  
1 Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Centre, Netherlands Institute for Pigment Disorders, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2 Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Centre, Netherlands Institute for Pigment Disorders, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam; Department of Dermatology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague, The Netherlands
3 Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Centre, Netherlands Institute for Pigment Disorders, University of Amsterdam; Department of Dermatology, VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Correspondence Address:
Lisa Komen
The Netherlands Institute for Pigment Disorders, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam
The Netherlands




How to cite this article:
Komen L, Vrijman C, Wietze van der Veen J P, de Rie MA, Wolkerstorfer A. Observations on CO2 laser preparation of recipient site for noncultured cell suspension transplantation in vitiligo.J Cutan Aesthet Surg 2016;9:133-135


How to cite this URL:
Komen L, Vrijman C, Wietze van der Veen J P, de Rie MA, Wolkerstorfer A. Observations on CO2 laser preparation of recipient site for noncultured cell suspension transplantation in vitiligo. J Cutan Aesthet Surg [serial online] 2016 [cited 2021 Nov 29 ];9:133-135
Available from: https://www.jcasonline.com/text.asp?2016/9/2/133/184055


Full Text

Dear Editor,

With interest, we read the review of Al-Hadidi et al. on the role of recipient site preparation techniques in the surgical management of vitiligo.[1] We agree with the conclusion that lasers are effective and valuable tools in the preparation of recipient sites. However, optimal laser settings and ablation depth are not known. We present two vitiligo patients where we observed that more superficial ablation of the recipient site in combination with noncultured autologous cell suspension transplantation (CST) can also be effective. We treated a 33-year-old woman (patient 1) and a 74-year-old man (patient 2), with stable nonsegmental vitiligo lesions on the legs. The cellular suspension was processed from a 1 cm × 1.5 cm to 0.2–0.3 mm thick split-thickness biopsy using a ReCell ® kit [2] (Avita Medical, Cambridge, UK). The recipient site was prepared with a 10,600 nm CO2 laser (Ultrapulse Encore, Active FX scanner, Lumenis, Santa Clara, CA, USA). In both patients, a first treatment site was prepared with 1 pass (200 mJ, 60 W, density 3, estimated depth of 209 microns), and a second treatment site with an additional pass (100 mJ, 60 W, density 3, estimated depth of 300 microns). [Table 1] shows erythema, reepithelialization, and repigmentation of the treatment sites. Erythema resolved faster in both patients in the least invasive setting. Reepithelialization was quicker in the least invasive setting in one patient. The different laser settings in combination with CST showed similar repigmentation, i.e., 90% and 75% repigmentation in both patients, respectively, after 6 and 15 months. Patient 1 and 2 [Figure 1] and [Figure 2] mentioned pain for 5–14 days after transplantation, without being able to assess a difference in pain between the sites.{Table 1}{Figure 1}{Figure 2}

On the one hand, laser settings to prepare recipient sites have to be of sufficient depth to make graft take possible. This is hypothesized to be at the papillary dermis and differs per body part.[3] On the other hand, these laser settings should be as less invasive as possible to allow rapid wound healing and prevent side effects. In CO2 laser resurfacing, the safety endpoint is the appearance of a “chamois” yellow skin color, which is seen at the reticular dermis.[4] The occurrence of pinpoint bleeding, seen at the dermoepidermal junction, has been advocated as immediate clinical endpoint in CST when using dermabrasion.[2],[5] This endpoint is affected by many factors and may therefore not be a reliable and reproducible clinical sign to predict the appropriate depth of ablation when using a laser.

In conclusion, these cases suggest that less invasive CO2 laser treatment in combination with CST could be as effective as and potentially safer than more invasive treatment. There is no optimal clinical endpoint for the ablation depth of the recipient site when using a CO2 laser. Further investigations on the laser settings are required before conclusions can be drawn. Furthermore, less invasive laser treatment such as more superficial ablative laser or fractional laser should be studied in combination with CST to obtain optimal treatment results with minimal side effects in the future.

Financial support and sponsorship

The ReCell kits were provided free of charge by Avita Medical.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1Al-Hadidi N, Griffith JL, Al-Jamal MS, Hamzavi I. Role of recipient-site preparation techniques and post-operative wound dressing in the surgical management of vitiligo. J Cutan Aesthet Surg 2015;8:79-87.
2Mulekar SV, Ghwish B, Al Issa A, Al Eisa A. Treatment of vitiligo lesions by ReCell vs. conventional melanocyte-keratinocyte transplantation: A pilot study. Br J Dermatol 2008;158:45-9.
3van Geel N, Ongenae K, De Mil M, Haeghen YV, Vervaet C, Naeyaert JM. Double-blind placebo-controlled study of autologous transplanted epidermal cell suspensions for repigmenting vitiligo. Arch Dermatol 2004;140:1203-8.
4El Hoseny SM. Treatment of upper- and lower-extremity vitiligo with epidermal grafts after CO2 laser resurfacing with systemic and topical steroids. Aesthetic Plast Surg 2010;34:157-66.
5Mulekar SV. Long-term follow-up study of segmental and focal vitiligo treated by autologous, noncultured melanocyte-keratinocyte cell transplantation. Arch Dermatol 2004;140:1211-5.